An Ethical Foreign Policy? Globalism as a Threat to the US National Interest

Wassim Daghrir

Abstract


An ethical foreign policy can have no objectives other than those that are of service to its own people. An unethical foreign policy, however, may pursue objectives that enhance the nation as a power, seeking dominance for its own sake, for the honor, glory and wealth of the state or a minority within the state, or spreading its ideology out of missionary fervor. The mainstream wisdom in the United States is that the US foreign policy agendas are virtuous and ethical, since they are oriented mainly towards the protection and enhancement of the American ‘National Interest’. Nevertheless, the orthodox perception among many foreign observers is that the American foreign policy is by no means ethical, since it is oriented exclusively towards the promotion of the Americans’ interests at the expense of the rest of the world. My thesis is that the US foreign policy is unethical and anti-democratic mainly because it is causing a lot of harm to the American taxpayers’ interests. I esteem that the American people are the real permanent victims of their country’s globalist stance. This article is based on an argumentative criticism of the mainstream American perception of U.S. foreign policy as well as a criticism of the foreign observers’ perception of American foreign policy. In a nutshell, this article tries to highlight the unethical nature of the American foreign policy with a focus on the complex justifications for such an undemocratic globalist agenda.


Keywords


Globalism vs. National Interest, Unethical Foreign Policy, American Exceptionalism vs. Hegemony.

Full Text:

PDF

References


http://www.state.gov/secretary/20092013clinton/rm/2011/10/175340.htm.

http://www.123helpme.com/truman-doctrine-view.asp?id=158012

Steven, K. (2009). America’s global image in the Obama era. WorldpublicOpinion.org, 7, 3-11.

US Census Bureau, www.census.gov.com.

World military expenditures: top ten spenders in 2010. (April 2001). Retrieved from www.sipri.org/yearbook/2011/04/04A.

The 15 countries with the highest military expenditures in 2011. (September 2012). Retrieved from

www.sipri.org/research/armaments/milex/resultoutput/milex_15-NBC News/Wall Street Journal Survey, September 26-30, 2012, p. 11,

Zinn, H. (2002). Operation enduring war. The Progressive, 3, 24-28.




DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.18533/journal.v4i7.747

Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.




.............................................................................................................................

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License

.............................................................................................................................

If you find difficulties in submitting manuscript please forward your doc file to support@theartsjournal.org. Our support team will assist you in submission process and other technical matters.

In order to get notifications on inbox please add theartsjournal.org in your email safe list.

Journal of Arts and Humanities (Print) ISSN:2167-9045

Journal of Arts and Humanities (Online) ISSN: 2167-9053

[Journal of Arts and Humanities previously published by MIR Center for Socio-Economic Research, MD, USA. From February 2018 this journal is published by the LAR Center Press, OR, USA]